American Cinematheque at the Egyptian Theatre Presents...
Making Movie History for Over 80 Years!

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Series Compiled by: Chris D.
Special Thanks to: MAGIDSON FILMS; Suzanne Leroy/SONY REPERTORY; Sarah Finklea/JANUS FILMS.

 

SOLD OUT SCREENINGS: There will be a waiting line for Sold Out screenings. Tickets often become available at the door the night of an event.

Sold out programs will be indicated here if sold out 24 hours in advance of screening date.

 

 

All guests are subject to availability. The Cinematheque will offer a refund due to guest cancellations only IF the refund transaction is complete PRIOR to the start of the show.

Tickets available 30 days in advance. Tickets are $10 general admission unless noted otherwise.
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The American Cinematheque is a non-profit 501 (C) (3) organization.
The Film Programs of the American Cinematheque are presented at the magnificently renovated, historic 1922 Grauman's Hollywood Egyptian Theatre. Located at 6712 Hollywood Boulevard.
Photo Credit: Randall Michelson. Detail of Egyptian Theatre Ceiling.

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<<< April 6 - 8, 2007 >>>

The Big Picture Strikes Back: More 70 MM Delights!

 

Discuss this series with other film fans on:
http://www.myspace.com/americancinematheque

 

This is an Egyptian Theatre Exclusive!

 

 

Please join us for encore screenings of three of the most-requested, most-beloved 70mm films we have ever shown at the American Cinematheque, BARAKA, LAWRENCE OF ARABIA and PLAYTIME.

 

 

Friday, April 6 – 7:30 PM

70mm Print!

BARAKA, 1992, Magidson Films, 96 min. If you have never seen BARAKA, one of the Cinematheque’s favorite movies, this is another chance to experience one of the most visually awesome films ever made. Inspired by the Sufi word that means "breath of life," BARAKA is a mind-expanding, spiritual journey around the globe (shot in 24 countries on 5 continents), from director/ cinematographer Ron Fricke (who photographed the earlier KOYANNISQATSI) and producer Mark Magidson (the Imax film CHRONOS). Filmed entirely without dialogue in a stunning cascade of crystalline, time-lapse 70mm. images, BARAKA is quite simply breathtaking. "Smashingly edited, superbly scored … speaks volumes about the planet without uttering a single word." – Suzan Ayscough, Variety

 

 

 

Saturday, April 7 – 7:30 PM

70mm Print!

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA, 1962, Sony Repertory, 216 min. The beautiful, near-godlike Peter O’Toole stars as the tortured Man Who Would Not Be King, T. E. Lawrence, who helped the Arabs revolt against European and Ottoman hegemony. Director David Lean’s epic is an absolute masterpiece – as close to perfect as a film can get. Featuring one of the finest casts in any motion picture: Omar Sharif (in his first major English-speaking role), Anthony Quinn, Jack Hawkins, Claude Rains and Alec Guinness as Prince Faisal. Director of Photography Freddie Young’s 70mm photography is rightly considered to be a work of genius, matched by Robert Bolt and Michael Wilson’s screenplay, Maurice Jarre’s stirring score and John Box’s production design. Winner of seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director. "When you’re in the desert, you look into infinity … It makes you feel terribly small, and also in a strange way, quite big." – David Lean

 

 

Wednesday, April 11 – 7:30 PM

In Glorious 70mm!

PLAYTIME, 1967, Janus Films, 126 min. Dir. Jacques Tati. If you missed our previous sold-out screenings, this may be one of your last chances to see the fully restored Jacques Tati masterpiece PLAYTIME, which was conceived originally as a 70mm viewing experience, then lost for over 30 years (there were only 35mm prints left of a cut version), and finally rescued by Tati's daughter Sophie Tatischeff and Jerome Deschamps. Monsieur Hulot must contact an American official in Paris, but he gets lost in a stylish maze of modern architecture filled with the latest technical gadgets. Caught in a tourist invasion, Hulot roams around Paris with a group of American tourists, causing chaos in his usual manner. The star of the film: the city built by Tati and called Tativille/Taticity. From surprise to surprise, it’s an exquisite and divine experience! François Truffaut, writing to Jacques Tati about PLAYTIME, said simply, "A film from another planet."